Saturday, March 19, 2011

All-Day [Slouchy] Beret

So, I've had a slouchy beret pattern in my Ravelry queue for about a year.  It wasn't until my friend started knitting the same pattern that I really got motivated to make my own . . . and realized I can't knit the same hat as her.  I went back through Ravelry and found Debbie Stoller's All-Day Beret.  The pattern is free from stitchnationyarn.com.  The hat had an open, funky knit pattern that I loved and a great slouchy fit.  The pattern recommends using 1 ball of Debbie Stoller's Bamboo Ewe yarn.  Instead, I purchased 1 ball of Debbie Stoller's Alpaca Love (hey, it was on clearance in a deep wine color).  Unfortunately, I wasn't thinking about the fact that a ball of Bamboo Ewe is significantly longer than one of Alpaca Love (177 yds. vs. 131 yds.).  As such, I had to get a little creative in the finishing. 

The pattern is easy to work and creates a reversible fabric (shown with WS out).  Once I had worked about 7 1/2" in the pattern, though, I realized that I was not going to have enough yarn.  So, I started decreasing rapidly at that point.  I followed the pattern for the decrease rows and sort of skipped the rows in between.  This gave the top of the hat a slighty pin-cushiony look that I actually really like.  Because I had to decrease the depth of my hat, it doesn't have as much slouch as the original pattern would have created.  I have a relatively small head and short neck, though, so the limited slouch doesn't bother me.  Overall, great pattern and great yarn.  There are plenty of other free patterns at stitchnationyarn.com.  Take a browse and give one a try.  Be creative and enjoy!

11 comments:

  1. I've been meaning to start the All Day Beret too. It looks super cute on you XD

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  2. Thanks, PandaBear (love the name, btw). That's actually my sister's head, but 1) she's super cute and 2) I think this hat looks great on everyone! Good luck with it

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  3. Did you start with 104 stitches like the pattern said? When I started this pattern the brim was huge and I am making it for a girl with a small head. Also whenever I came back around to the beginning again I had two stitches left over...is that supposed to happen? Im sorry, I do not have much experience with knitting patterns like this. Any suggestions?

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  4. I did start with 104 stitches. The brim is knit in purl 2, knit 2 ribbing, so each rib is a total of 4 stitches. 4 divides evenly into 104--you should have 26 sets of P2 K2 with no stitches left over. The two extra stitches might be the result of forgetting to purl or knit somewhere, or you might have accidentally added two stitches. This can happen when you forget to put the working yarn on the correct side of the needle when you are switching between purled and knit stitches (it's called a yarn over (YO)). If you aren't very familiar with knitting patterns, I would suggest you try to alter the size by going to a smaller needle or finer yarn than by altering the pattern itself. It might take a little trial and error, but you'll be able to stick to the pattern without trying to remember modifications. Good luck and let me know how it turns out!

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  5. Im sorry if the answers to my questions are obvious, but on the pattern it says that the diagonal parts are multiples of four stitches, yet when I do the P1, ssk, yo, s1 pattern isnt that five stitches? p1 = 1, ssk = 1, yo = 2, and s1 = 1? Im missing something obvious here and its really frustrating :(

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  6. Don't be sorry or frustrated. Let me try to explain it like this. Say you have 104 stitches and you are getting ready to start the left diagonal. You are looking at the first four stitches of the round. The first one is going to get purled, the second is going to get slipped, the third is going to be slipped, and the fourth is going to be knit. P=1, ssk=2, k=1. 1+2+1=4. This math is complicated by the fact that the pattern has a decrease (ssk) followed by an increase (yo). So, you purl 1, ssk (this takes two stitches to 1), yo (this takes 0 stitches to 1), knit 1. P=1, ssk=1, yo=1, k=1. So, a full equation of this would look like this: 1+ (2 --> 1) + (0 --> 1) + 1 = 4. The yo isn't 2 stitches, it's just one new stitch that wasn't there before. Ultimately, when you start the pattern you should have 104 stitches and you should end each round with 104 until you start to do the crown shaping. I hope this helps. If not, email me at amightystranger@gmail.com and I'll try again! Good luck and stick with it, it makes a really cute hat!

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  7. Oh my gosh! So the YO and the knit1 are together! I think my problem was that I was completing the YO with a knit stitch, then adding another one because I thought that was what it meant. That's how I was ending up with five stitches. All I can say is this is my first time attempting to work a YO into a pattern. Wow I feel silly now! :D I'll start it over and let you know how it turns out! Thank you so much for your help and patience!

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  8. Oh, good! I'm glad that helped. The YO is literally just the act of moving the working yarn to the opposite side of the needle from what it would normally be on. Definitely let me know how it turns out!

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  9. I started the project over and it is turning out great so far. All of my friends are wanting hats like this now. :) Thank you so much for helping me with this!

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  10. I started the project over and the hat is turning out great so far. I even had a random girl come up to me and ask me to explain how to do it! :D Thank you so much for your help.

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  11. hi your hat turn out great! I've been following the pattern exactly as it says but the result dosn't seem the same as yours in the little spaces between the loops and i don't know why. Im making this beret as a gift for a friend and i don't know if i have to redo it from the start can you upload a short video showing how to start the right and left diagonal?

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